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  • Classic Days Schloss Dyck 2018: Automotive variety at the moated castle.
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    Automotive variety at the moated castle.

    Classic Days Schloss Dyck 2018.

Elegant classic cars, spectators and participants.

Classic Days Schloss Dyck: the very title sounds glamorous. And the event itself even exceeded expectations: with impressive scenery around the moated castle in the Rhineland, a great park with huge old trees. And everywhere, dotted here and there, including on the lawns; a fabulous number of classic cars. Appearances matter at Schloss Dyck: that goes for the Concours d’Élégance “Jewels in the Park”, which awards prizes to the most beautiful cars. And it goes for the spectators and participants, some of whom turn up in historical outfits. While the ladies love to put the emphasis on elegance, how beautiful, many of the gentlemen opt for a connection with the automobile, how good. So the first weekend in August provided an excellent opportunity for a stroll and a chat about the forms and colours of vehicles as well as their diversity.


One of the oldest vehicles at the event: Mercedes 75 PS Spider from 1907.

One of the oldest vehicles at the event: Mercedes 75 PS Spider from 1907.

Greeting from 1886: authentic replica of the Benz Patent Motor Car, the world’s first automobile.

Greeting from 1886: authentic replica of the Benz Patent Motor Car, the world’s first automobile.


Mercedes-Benz Classic@Apfelwiese.”

A new addition this year: the Mercedes-Benz Classic greenhouses on the Apfelwiese. The light tent architecture is based on Gottlieb Daimler’s workshop in Cannstatt, the germ cell of the automobile and motorised mobility. It was from there, in the late 19th century, that important inventions went out into the world, and there was only one serious competitor: Carl Benz in Mannheim. Mercedes-Benz Classic brought several vehicles to Schloss Dyck. One of them was especially resplendent in the sunshine: an English “Stroke Eight” pickup from the 1970s.


“Stroke Eight” pickup with Bonanza cycle.

Matching: the loading area of this forerunner of today’s X-Class accommodated an original Bonanza cycle, painted in the typical orange of the day. The vehicle made its own way from Stuttgart to Dyck. The pickup, of course, anything else would have been too much of a challenge, despite the Bonanza’s three gears. Even so, the fox’s tail on the cycle was fully exposed to the wind for 450 kilometres. The “Stroke Eight” was Mercedes-Benz’s first million-seller, with over 1.9 million saloons, long-wheelbase saloons, coupés and chassis units being built between 1968 and 1976. It was such a chassis that was used for the pickup.


Forerunner of the Mercedes-Benz X-Class: “Stroke Eight” pickup from the 1970s.

Forerunner of the Mercedes-Benz X-Class: “Stroke Eight” pickup from the 1970s.

Bye-bye to the “real world”: those attending Classic Days Schloss Dyck become completely immersed in the world of classic automobiles.

Bye-bye to the “real world”: those attending Classic Days Schloss Dyck become completely immersed in the world of classic automobiles.


Diversity is what distinguishes Classic Days Schloss Dyck.

All of a sudden, the howling of US police sirens could be heard. Two black saloons with enormous impact protection bars and red-blue flashing lights made their way round the corner. At the wheel: “policemen” with broad grins on their faces. At the roadside: a big thumbs up from the spectators. This, too, is what Classic Days Schloss Dyck is all about: tremendous diversity. Here police cars, there highly polished automotive jewels and, dotted everywhere in between, everyday classic cars. Now and again, there was also an impressive racing car to be seen.


Around the circuit in the “Prinz Heinrich Car”.

Most of them drove in groups even on a 2.8-kilometre circuit. All aboard: although the Benz “Prinz Heinrich Car” from 1910 has a total of four seats, it is a thoroughbred racing car. Seated at the front behind the wheel was racing driver Klaus Ludwig, with colleague Dieter Glemser next to him. And off we go. The car’s remarkable features include shaft drive, dual ignition and four-valve technology as well as an aerodynamically optimised body with an eye-catching pointed rear end. Authentically restored by Mercedes-Benz Classic, the racing car is one of just two examples still preserved today.


Sophisticated technology: Benz “Prinz Heinrich Car” from 1910. Klaus Ludwig at the wheel, with Dieter Glemser next to him.

Sophisticated technology: Benz “Prinz Heinrich Car” from 1910. Klaus Ludwig at the wheel, with Dieter Glemser next to him.

In excellent mood: Jutta Benz at the autograph session. Next to her: racing driver Hans Herrmann.

In excellent mood: Jutta Benz at the autograph session. Next to her: racing driver Hans Herrmann.


Autograph sessions are popular.

It was surprising how quietly the “Prinz Heinrich Car” made its way round the circuit. And how fast it was as it sped past. Could it have been that the two brand ambassadors were in a hurry to get to their next meeting? An autograph session, always very popular with the public. Alongside Klaus Ludwig and Dieter Glemser were Jutta Benz, Hans Herrmann and Jochen Mass, who were happy to put their signature on anything placed in front of them. And it was all done with a friendly smile. Where else do you get so close to the stars?


Jewels from ALL TIME STARS.

Now a visit from ALL TIME STARS: the vehicle trading platform of Mercedes-Benz Classic was present at the Classic Days with two exclusive SL sports cars: a beige-coloured 300 SL Roadster (W 198) from 1959, which was on show at the International Motor Show in Turin, and a horizon-blue 280 SL “Pagoda” (W 113) from 1970.


Both vehicles belong to the “Concours Edition”: in as-new condition, they were resplendent in the sunshine and attracted plenty of interest. As the hot sun slowly set on the final day of Classic Days Schloss Dyck, their appearance, too, had been worthwhile.