Guy Kawasaki

Guy Kawasaki.

“Stop reading inspirational quotes and get to work.”

The evangelist.

Guy Kawasaki is one of the people who, alongside Steve Jobs, were evangelizing the idea of the personal computer back in the 1980s, helping to ensure its triumphal success. Three years after his pioneering work with Apple, Kawasaki produced the first monument to this revolutionary age of start-ups with his book “The Macintosh Way”, beginning his extraordinary career as an author, speaker, and evangelist. Kawasaki graduated from Stanford with a degree in Psychology and from UCLA with an MBA. He knows Silicon Valley better than almost anyone else and is thoroughly familiar with its current start-up scene including social media, graphics, and devices.

Kawasaki is currently the chief evangelist of an up-and-coming Australian start-up called Canva. The Mercedes-Benz brand ambassador is dedicated to empowering people and therefore has also been a member of the Wikimedia Foundation’s Board of Trustees. As a keynote speaker, the Hawaiian-born technology insider speaks internationally to leading companies around the world about innovation, entrepreneurship, and social media.

Guy Kawasaki taking a picture with his phone.

As a New York Times and Wall Street Journal best-selling author of thirteen books, Guy Kawasaki writes about the irresistible force of conviction and about what mistakes people should avoid in order to turn a brilliant idea into a success. In his customary inspiring manner, he encourages people worldwide to be themselves, to be open and unprejudiced towards others, and to smile a little more often.

Social Media Wall.

“DIGITAL LIGHT”.

Future headlamp technology in HD quality.
DIGITAL LIGHT: The new HD headlamp generation from Mercedes-Benz, working in combination with the navigation system, can also project direction arrows onto the road surface.

Resolution of two million pixels.

For the Mercedes-Benz developers the future of car light lies in dazzle-free main beam in HD quality. The revolutionary headlamp technology shines with maximum performance and facilitates communication and pioneering driver assistance. The new HD headlamp generation from Mercedes-Benz features chips that work with over one million micromirrors, i. e. more than two million in total per vehicle. The intelligent control logic required for the dynamic light functions was developed by Mercedes-Benz itself. Algorithms receive detailed information about the surroundings from the vehicle sensors, and from it calculate in real time the brightness value for each one of over two million pixels.

Resolution of two million pixels.

For the Mercedes-Benz developers the future of car light lies in dazzle-free main beam in HD quality. The revolutionary headlamp technology shines with maximum performance and facilitates communication and pioneering driver assistance. The new HD headlamp generation from Mercedes-Benz features chips that work with over one million micromirrors, i. e. more than two million in total per vehicle. The intelligent control logic required for the dynamic light functions was developed by Mercedes-Benz itself. Algorithms receive detailed information about the surroundings from the vehicle sensors, and from it calculate in real time the brightness value for each one of over two million pixels.

DIGITAL LIGHT: The new HD headlamp generation from Mercedes-Benz, working in combination with the navigation system, can also project direction arrows onto the road surface.

DIGITAL LIGHT: Countless possibilities.

This dynamism and precision gives this intelligent system well-nigh countless possibilities to provide ideal, high-resolution light distribution which suits the surrounding conditions perfectly. “The decisive factor is not the technology in the headlamp but the digital intelligence behind it”, stresses Gunter Fischer, Head of Exterior Body Development and Vehicle Operating Systems at Daimler AG. The innovation was developed by Mercedes-Benz in collaboration with two partner companies and it is a good example of the internal cooperation between the Daimler research and the passenger car development on the road to mass production.

DIGITAL LIGHT: If the vehicle identifies pedestrians at the side of the road, the vehicle can project a zebra crossing onto the road surface as a signal to safely cross the road.
DIGITAL LIGHT: The new generation of HD headlamps can project high-resolution images onto the road surface.

Optimum vision and maximum brightness.

Sensors, such as cameras or radar, detect other road users and powerful computers evaluate the data as well as digital cards in milliseconds and give the headlamps the commands for adapting the light distribution in all situations. These efforts yield optimum vision for the driver without dazzling other road users as well as innovative functions with added safety. “With our ‘DIGITAL LIGHT’ strategy we are not striving for beam records, rather we want to achieve optimum vision and maximum brightness without glare. Innovative functions for supporting the driver and staging communication with other road users significantly optimise safety when driving at night,” emphasises Gunter Fischer.

Contributions towards traffic safety.

Mercedes-Benz does not only want to achieve the ideal light distribution for every driving situation with “DIGITAL LIGHT” but guide and support the driver in a targeted manner in critical situations such as driving through narrow roadworks. Additionally, it will be possible to project light traces onto the road to replace missing road markings. Moreover, digital light systems can also beam messages like direction arrows or warnings onto the road. Via “DIGITAL LIGHT” the car will also communicate with other road users in the future.

So symbols or a zebra crossing for pedestrians can be projected. “DIGITAL LIGHT” thus delivers important contributions towards traffic safety and modules on the road to accident-free and autonomous driving – as an integral component of the overall INTELLIGENT DRIVE strategy. What was unveiled in 2015 in the research vehicle F 015 as a vision has now been implemented in demo vehicles and will be on the road in the near future.

DIGITAL LIGHT: In narrow road construction lanes a line of light is projected onto the road surface which shows the vehicle width.

Video.

Related.

Fearlessly taking the leap

Juliane Wurm climbing

Former professional boulderer Juliane Wurm talks about trusting oneself and the career after her career.

Juliane Wurm must have overcome the power of gravity. There is no other way to explain how she could walk around a wall that nimbly. No step seems too small for her, no leap too far. Juliane is one of the best bouldering women in the world as all her victories at World, European and German championships would suggest. She talked with us about why nevertheless she decided against her professional career.

Juliane Wurm climbing on Tenerife
Juliane doing one of the things she loves most: outdoor climbing, here in front of Mount Teide on Tenerife.

Juliane’s coordination and balance led her to be the youngest German climbing champion back in 2006 when she was only 16 years old. But at the age of 18, she decided to commit herself exclusively to the challenging sport of bouldering from then on. In bouldering, the routes are more complicated and the challenges more intense. Juliane knew that bouldering suited her better than classic rope climbing, where strength is much more important. So in 2009, Juliane won her first German championship in bouldering and subordinated school and studies to concentrate on the sport. In 2014, she reached her goal by winning the world title. Even today, as she recounts the moment on a roof terrace in Cologne (her newly adopted home), she gets goose bumps.

After her win, she felt that she wanted to see more of the world outside the climbing halls. Not a woman to do things by half-measures, she decided to say farewell to professional sports. It was not easy for her to resign, Juliane now recalls, but she has never regretted it. She listened to her gut feeling and did not allow herself to be misled in her decision to swap competition for studies. We accompanied her in Cologne for one day to learn what motivated her to take this step.

Juliane Wurm with climbing ropes

You have just been to the World Cup in Paris, the first one for you as an audience member and not a participant. How was that for you?

It was very different from the usual and very weird at first. I didn’t have to ask myself whether I had been training enough or had eaten the right food, or when I should start my warm-up. It was exciting nevertheless: I am coaching the national youth squad and get to share my experience with the young climbers.

What is the most important advice you give to them?

That you’ll only go places with something if you enjoy doing it. I’m really passionate about this sport. I never had to force myself to train and I can think about climbing for hours without getting bored. That is priceless.

01 07

You started climbing at an early age. When did you realise that you wanted to do it professionally?

At eighteen I changed from rope climbing to bouldering because I realised it suited me better. I swapped schools to participate in competitions during the school year. In 2012, I started to study medicine. Besides that, I also kept on climbing but it wasn’t enough. I noticed that I could only get better if I fully concentrated on climbing. I had to put my studies on hold. But it was worth it: that year I won the World Cup.

What makes bouldering special for you?

Rope climbing depends on the strength in your forearms. Bouldering requires agility, coordination and balance as well as the right technique. In a competition, it all comes down to your head. You have four minutes to climb a boulder. So, you cannot afford to be irritated by others or by failing at the first attempt.

Juliane Wurm sitting on the floor drinking water

Did your head play a decisive role in winning the World Cup?

The World Cup series is decided over eight competitions. The World Cup takes place over the course of a single weekend. Everything has to be perfect. I had always put myself under pressure before at other world championships. You are so full of anticipation that it’s hard not to do that. But in Munich it was different: I had had a good season and wanted to have my home country’s World Cup. The competition went really well. After the semi-finals I was in the lead but I did not expect to win because the one who leads the scoring before the final has to start last. From a statistical perspective, they have a low chance of winning. You don’t know the boulder but you know how many attempts the others needed. That is tough on the nerves. However, in my case, it calmed me down. I wanted to go out and have fun. I had trust in myself. What happened then is indescribable. The scenery at the Olympic Park is incredibly beautiful. You climb under the famous glass roof, the audience cheers. It was a moment of pure happiness holding the last grip in my hands. I still get goose bumps today when I think about it.

Juliane Wurm behind the wheel of a Mercedes-Benz GLA 220 d

Nevertheless, you finished your career very young, at the age of 25.

Not everyone can understand the decision but I feel strong about it. There is no point in constantly questioning the choice. After the World Cup, I dallied with the idea of stopping, but then went on to win the European Championship and took part in two more World Cups, but I really was far less motivated than before.

Despite your victories? Why?

It is great to prepare for a season. You climb, you travel, you meet great people. But it also wears you out. I spent my entire youth in climbing halls and at competitions; every summer was entirely scheduled. I wanted to have time for other things. I thought a lot about whether to stop. But the time for the break was simply right.

01 05

It is certainly not easy when suddenly your everyday life needs to be restructured because things like the preparation for the big competitions are gone. What is waiting for you now?

I can be a normal student and still travel and climb as much as I want. I am climbing more outside again, in Fontainebleau, the Eifel or the Franconian Jura. Moreover, I can concentrate fully on studying. Next year, I will go to the USA for a research stay. I’m in no hurry to finish my studies – I want to find something new that I enjoy. But I am sure it will work out.

Thank you very much for the interview!