Mercedes-Benz Grow Up: With Grow Up, Mercedes-Benz is breaking new ground in marketing communications.

“Grow up.” – Stories of a new generation.

With “Grow up.”, Mercedes-Benz is taking a new approach to marketing communications. The most extensive content creation in the history of the brand has been realised for the five models of the compact-car family.

Between adulthood and philistinism.

With more than 100 moving-image sequences and over 90 lifestyle and product images, stories of a new generation will be told until the end of this year. The campaign focuses on people caught between the coolness of adolescence and the squareness of adulthood who embody the attitude to life of the new compacts. One of the main characters is the US rapper A$AP Rocky. The campaign launches in early March 2017. On the internet, those who are interested can visit www.mercedes-benz.com/growup not just for in-depth product information, but also for flexible content additions from the individual markets, such as the integration of the “WhiteArt Edition” special models. 

 

Mercedes-Benz Grow Up: One of the protagonists is the US rapper A $ AP Rocky. The campaign starts in early March 2017.
Mercedes-Benz Grow Up:

More modernity, progressiveness and dynamism.

“‘Grow up.’ is much more than a major campaign about a model series. It is a further move forward by the brand as a whole towards more modernity, progressivism and dynamism across the entire brand identity of Mercedes-Benz,” says Dr. Jens Thiemer, Vice President Marketing Mercedes-Benz Cars, outlining the goal of the campaign. “With ‘Grow up.’, we are reinterpreting traditional values and attitudes towards Mercedes-Benz while showcasing their modern-day interpretation and relevance within the Generations X and Y. Realised in collaboration with our agency antoni, ‘Grow up.’ is an unconventional campaign, which, in terms of its consistent digital focus and the mechanics of its content, does not immediately come across as advertising.”

A young, self-confident generation.

Under the campaign hub www.mercedes-benz.com/growup, the campaign centres around five films that stand for the five models of the compact-car family. They tell stories about young people and present-day adolescence with all the associated highs and lows. One film, for example, is about two girlfriends who, after an argument followed by months of silence, realise that true friendship is something precious that can also survive difficult times. Directed by the award-winning Swedish director Gustav Johansson, the films present images with a young, authentic look. With no artificial light or staged posing, the vehicles are included in the action in a way that seems natural. The campaign is therefore surprising and describes the world of Mercedes-Benz designed to make a young, self-assured generation of “grown ups” enthusiastic about the brand.

Mercedes-Benz Grow Up: At the center of the campaign are five films, which are under the campaign for the five models of the compact car family.
Mercedes-Benz Grow Up: The protagonists of the campaign include A $ AP Rocky and Lucy Walters.

The new faces of contemporary luxury.

The attitude towards life of the new generation of young grown-ups is exemplified by the US rapper A$AP Rocky. The film about the CLA Coupé tells the previously untold story of how the musician and fashion icon rose from Harlem to the world stage. “My life has been a succession of setbacks. All that counts is not to let it get you down and every time to get back on your feet again. You have to reinvent your life until you’re successful,” says A$AP Rocky, describing his philosophy of life.

Other characters in the films include the actress Lucy Walters, the actress and producer Julia Morrison, the actress and director Anna Zahn, the actor John Rue of “House of Cards” fame and the photographer Alice Moitié. The 25-year-old Frenchwoman is also responsible for the image motifs. With her predilection for a new style of vintage aesthetics, she fits in with the message of the campaign. The campaign launches in early March with a TV ad that uses a “best of” the five stories to make people curious to learn more.

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Short Trip with Ida Tin

Clue founder Ida Tin
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A trip through wintry Berlin with the Danish Femtech entrepreneur.

Machine learning is allowing computers to compose classical music, drive cars, increase data security, predict the future—and now figure out the natural cycles of women’s bodies. Using equal parts science and technology, period-tracking app Clue connects five million women around the world to themselves and each other—with personal analytics, educational material, and immensely thoughtful design. Though the Berlin-based app often takes the role of educator, Clue founder Ida Tin stays in constant pursuit of knowledge. Between expanding her business and raising her children, she delves into the world of Femtech, learning from and connecting with innovators in the emerging sphere to provide her users with the most accurate and technologically advanced insights. Fresh from a $20 million round of funding, Ida Tin took She’s Mercedes for a short trip to Tempelhofer Feld to share the strategies and motivation techniques behind her revolutionary start-up.

What was the path that led you to found Clue?

I have always been curious about women’s health and was a Quantified Self person (someone who incorporates technology and data analysis into their daily life) long before I knew the term. When I dreamed up the idea of Clue, an app that helps women track their symptoms to understand the patterns in their cycles, I felt that there had been very little innovation in family planning since the pill came out. I was wondering how it could be that we managed to walk on the moon but that most women still don’t know which days they can or can’t get pregnant. I personally needed such a tool to manage that very important part of my life. And I was also convinced that many other women would find an app like Clue not only very useful but also very empowering.

Danish entrepreneur Ida Tin

Which memorable highs and lows did you encounter on the way?

One of the toughest, but also most rewarding, things about launching Clue has been to start a conversation about subjects that for so long just weren’t talked about. Every woman in the world – some half of the world’s population – faces the realities that come with menstruation and fertility, and yet these are topics that have been considered “niche”, lacked scientific research and still remain societal taboos in some regions. I’m proud to be part of the femtech space of companies opening up the global dialogue about female health.

05

Is it easy for you to kick back and relax or are you always switched on?

No, it isn’t, and I’m currently doing a lot of body work to get better at it. I know how much strength there is in being connected to my body, and leveraging the body to relax my mind. I am exploring my body in new ways, and a lot of it is fundamentally about learning to relax.

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Whatever happens in life, there will be learnings and a way forward. Ida Tin
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How do you deal with risks?

Fundamentally I believe that whatever happens in life, there will be learnings and a way forward. Or to put it even more radically, whatever happens—the only choice is to make the best of it. And I remember the Dalai Lama’s words that sometimes not getting what you want is the greatest gift. It makes life kind of failure proof. There is no such thing as failure.

Clue founder Ida Tin

What was the best advice ever given to you, and who gave it?

My mother always says to not worry in advance. To me it’s this incredibly optimistic view of not making a drama of something that might or could happen. Because it might not, and then all the worries were pointless, and I guess even if things do happen that are unwanted, worrying beforehand doesn’t help. It’s also a reminder to cherish what is here right now, which is good.

Good luck and thank you very much for the interview!

Mercedes-Benz IFS Awards London Fashion Week AW17: International Fashion Showcase in Somerset House in London.

International Fashion Showcase 2017 presented by Mercedes-Benz.

Mercedes-Benz presents the International Fashion Showcase 2017 in London’s Somerset House.

Mercedes-Benz with new partners.

Mercedes-Benz continues its commitment to supporting and mentoring designers with the British Fashion Council and the British Council at the International Fashion Showcase (IFS) 2017, a platform showcasing emerging talents from 26 countries with an award ceremony.

The IFS winning designer will be given the opportunity to showcase their latest collection at one of the Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week platforms.

Mercedes-Benz IFS Awards London Fashion Week AW17: Emerging design talents from 26 countries were presented.

Mercedes-Benz supports emerging designers.

Via the International Designer Exchange Programme (IDEP), Mercedes-Benz supports and presents five selected emerging designers in a dedicated area at IFS 2017.

Mercedes-Benz IFS Awards London Fashion Week AW17: Five young talents were presented in an exclusive exhibition area.
Mercedes-Benz IFS Awards London Fashion Week AW17: Designer Steven Tai took up the topic of bookworm.

Steven Tai: Back to the roots.

Nerds are Steven Tai’s inspiration. For S/S 17, Tai revisits the bookworm character that shaped his debut collection. The result is a refined collection featuring masterfully manipulated organza patiently hand-cut on bias and folded with zigzag stitching across the hems. It’s meticulous and oddly poetic.

Angel Chen: Local Identities.

Angel Chen’s fascination with China’s distinct heritage – their traditional dress, embroidery, ceremonies and myths – merges with tech-driven fabric treatments in her S/S 17 collection. African cultural traditions recaptured Chen’s imagination for A/W 17, taking inspiration from the embroidery of the Cameroonian Bamileke tribe, embellished crowns of Nigerian Yoruba kings and beadwork worn by the Nyangatom women of Ethiopia.

Mercedes-Benz IFS Awards London Fashion Week AW17: Designer Angel Chen was inspired by Africa.
Mercedes-Benz IFS Awards London Fashion Week AW17: Designer William Fan dealt with the utopia of the cultural struggle in China.

William Fan: Cultural Clash.

Taking cues from his German upbringing and Chinese heritage, William Fan looks towards the culture-clashing utopia of Chinatown in his latest collection “Afternoon Stories”. Fan’s ageless and unisex aesthetic provides the perfect canvas to interpret the diverse characters and contrasts that meet in this urban enclave. The old, the new, the cheap, the chic and the Asian and Europeans elements fuse together in Fan’s colour- and texture-rich collection.

David Ferreira: Fantasy couture.

David Ferreira celebrates the traditional fado music of Portugal, paying tribute to the pioneering diva that popularised the genre in the streets and taverns of 1830s Lisbon, A Severa. Derived from the Latin “fatum” – meaning “fate” or “destiny” – and inscribed by UNESCO as an Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, Ferreira evokes fado’s melancholic spirit and the tragic fate of its near mythical heroine in colour, detail and fabric.

Mercedes-Benz IFS Awards London Fashion Week AW17: Designer David Ferreira paid tribute to the Diva Servera.
Mercedes-Benz IFS Awards London Fashion Week AW17: Anna K. created a unique wardrobe with bows, lace and frill.

Anna K: Young globetrotter.

Anna K creates a whimsical wardrobe complete with bows, lace and ruffles. The Anna K world is one of a coquettish Alice in Wonderland where quirky slogans meet messages of female empowerment in a sugary palette of pastel pinks, greens and blues. By the age of twenty-one the Kiev native showcased her collections in all the major fashion capitals, presenting her collections globally whilst producing locally.

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A creative chameleon

Mafalda Millies in New York
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The New York-based multi-hyphenate Mafalda Millies talks about creative expression across all genres.

A creative mind is rarely bound to just one medium of expression. In a world where art disciplines overlap and merge and cultural production adapts strategies of commercial production and vice versa, the multi-faceted film and art director Mafalda Millies draws from the synergies around her to create beautiful works of art that transcend genres and formats.

The native German studied in Paris, Berlin and Austin, Texas before relocating to New York City where she is now the creative director of C3 Management, a music management company with clients including the likes of NAS, Future, The Strokes and MSMR. Millies’ most recent music video for the latter earned the band and her multiple awards at renowned international music video festivals. Besides her work for C3 and their clients, Millies also co-founded the creative collective Starecase and art directed the contemporary performance piece “Virtually There” in collaboration with curator Roya Sachs in 2016.

During one of New York’s infamous blizzards we met her at her private home to learn more about the creative chameleon. Luckily, Millies was not discouraged by freezing temperatures and snow and so we ventured out to discover her neighbourhood in a CLA 250 and talk about her work in the creative industries.

CLA 250: Fuel consumption combined: 6.6–6.4 l/100 km; combined CO₂ emissions: 153–148 g/km.*

05

How did your multidisciplinary skill set evolve in regards to being a creative director, art and film director now delving into art direction in performing arts?

In order to understand the different shapes and dimensions a production can take as a whole, I believe it is important to have a certain degree of technical knowledge of all the different departments involved. To this end I constantly push myself to learn more about each individual discipline and their media. This ranges from learning more about the technicalities involved in light-, costume- & stage design, to becoming more proficient in the different programmes involved in postproduction. Having recently entered the world of performance has introduced me to an entirely new range of media to uncover. Preparing a performance for a live audience comes with an entirely new set of challenges, which I am incredibly excited to be exploring.

How did working in film prepare you to work on a ballet or theatre performance?

In the early stages of a production each individual department usually operates somewhat isolated until very close to the actual show or shoot. To this end, my work in film prepared me for the challenges of having to visualize and anticipate the ways in which each element of preproduction will come together at the very end – with changes happening right up until the last minute.

03

Your work and creative approach seem to reflect the German principle of “Gesamtkunstwerk”—is this holistic approach to art an essential part of your process and creative aspirations? If so, why?

‪The concept of a “Gesamt(kunst)werk” is definitely apparent in both the outlining structure and conception of my work. Structurally, my projects usually involve a set of different collaborators that all create work that culminates in a collective whole – in which one component is never truly complete without the others.

Artistically, I’m drawn to the ability to bring together a range of diverse artists to create something universally encompassing, emotionally unpredictable and thought-provoking. It allows for a new type of collective interpretation of an idea or theme, which I feel particularly attracted to. I believe that it is these “shared instincts” that make a production truly immersive and impactful.

Mafalda Millies in a Mercedes-Benz

The videos you have directed and produced as well as your latest ballet project “Virtually There” seem to all explore darker aspects of human culture or perhaps inconsistencies that lead viewers to a more multifaceted view of humanity. What initially draws you to your creative subjects?

‪What generally draws me to a subject is the desire to understand it better, to unravel it and reinterprete it in my own way. At the same time, I tend to shy away from making strong statements of my own. Instead, I prefer the idea of inviting people on a visual journey that moves them to reflect further upon the theme on their own.

In this vein, “Virtually There” was not intended as a critique of human nature and evolution, but rather hopes to illuminate society’s current dependence on digital technology. The ballet was inspired by Oskar Schlemmer’s “Triadic Ballet” from 1922 which in turn explored the impact that machine culture and the industrial revolution were having on society at the turn of the century.

I find myself preoccupied and returning to subjects involving the impact of technological advancements and emerging social media on ideas of identity, community, isolation, and escapism. I am interested in the ways in which our understanding of “self” and society has evolved in recent years. Perhaps because it scares me …

Mafalda Millies in New York

In what ways does your personal space reflect your professional and creative sensibilities?

Entirely! There is no way for me to separate the two. My flatmate Roya Sachs – a curator with whom I co-directed “Virtually There” – and I share a mutual fascination for the Bauhaus, its entire aesthetic and many of its members. We are slowly assembling a proud collection of objects, books and artefacts that reflect this obsession. Being at home, surrounded by objects and imagery that I find meaningful and inspiring, is very important to me.

What initially brought you to New York? How and where do you find inspiration in NYC?

What essentially “got” me to New York was my current job as the creative director of C3 Management, but I have always been very drawn to the city. I love New Yorkers work ethic, their collaborative and multifaceted nature, and the constant overlap and proximity of cultures.

There are so many different places and institutions that are inspiring, among them the New Museum and the Whitney Museum of American Art. Otherwise I love the Met Breuer, the Noguchi Museum in Queens, spending my afternoons at the Metrograph Cinema, or going to BAM—where I just saw the most mesmerizing performance “Last Work”, choreographed by Ohad Naharin with the Batsheva Dance Company.

07

What projects are coming up for you?

I will be directing a few music videos this upcoming month, the first being for the single TIGHTROPE by LPX—aka Lizzy Plappinger, former lead singer of the duo MSMR. The video will follow a dark, sci-fi 80s aesthetic made up entirely of block colours. Karole Armitage will be doing the choreography, which I am incredibly thrilled about as I absolutely admire her work and love collaborating with her—Karole also did the choreography for “Virtually There”.

Roya and I are currently in talks with different institutions to get “Virtually There” on tour for 2018/2019; whilst we are also working on a new performance piece.

Good luck and thank you very much for the interview!

* The figures are provided in accordance with the German regulation 'PKW-EnVKV' and apply to the German market only. Further information on official fuel consumption figures and the official specific CO₂ emissions of new passenger cars can be found in the EU guide 'Information on the fuel consumption, CO₂ emissions and energy consumption of new cars', which is available free of charge at all sales dealerships, from DAT Deutsche Automobil Treuhand GmbH and at www.dat.de.

Mercedes-AMG G 63 (W 463): The Beast. As much as it is a beast it is also a true icon or a statement on wheels.

Guest Feature: GTspirit Winter Experience 2017.

AMG wolf pack: The second edition of the GTspirit Winter Experience took place during a weekend in January.
Text: Des Sellmeijer
Photos: Michael Schoellhorn

All statements in this article are personal opinions and impressions of the author and sometimes not of the Daimler AG.

AMG supplied three different winter cars: the Mercedes-AMG GLS 63 4MATIC (X 166), the Mercedes-AMG G 63 Edition 463 (W 463) and the Mercedes-AMG GLE 63 S 4MATIC (W 166).

Mercedes-AMG GLE 63 S 4MATIC: Fuel consumption combined: 11.8 l/100 km; combined CO₂ emissions: 276 g/km.*

Mercedes-AMG G 63: Fuel consumption combined: 13.8 l/100 km; combined CO₂ emissions: 322 g/km.*

Mercedes-AMG GLS 63 4MATIC: Fuel consumption combined: 12.3 l/100 km; combined CO₂ emissions: 288 g/km.*

Weekend with AMG wolf pack.

At a recent weekend in January, supercar owners and car enthusiasts from over nine different countries met up for the second GTspirit Winter Experience. Mercedes-Benz and Mercedes-AMG provided us with three all-wheel drive vehicles for the winter tour from the German city of Munich to Sölden in the Austrian Alps. The AMG wolf pack was complemented with several teams who joined the event with their own cars.

AMG supplied three different winter cars to the GTspirit crew: the Mercedes-AMG GLS 63 4MATIC, the Mercedes-AMG G 63 Edition 463 and the Mercedes-AMG GLE 63 S 4MATIC. Although on paper they might look very similar – large SUVs all equipped with the famous 5.5 litre AMG V8 biturbo engine also known as M 157. But in reality each of the three cars has its own distinct character.

Mercedes-AMG GLE 63 S – the sports car.

The GLE 63 S 4MATIC is the sports car of the three. The 5.5 litre V8 produces a maximum of 585 hp and 760 Nm of torque, with a lower weight than the other two it rockets from 0–100 km/h in just 4.2 seconds and tops out at an incredible 280 km/h. To put that into perspective: the nil to 100 sprint is as quick as the former CLK 63 AMG Black Series. And it is not just fast in a straight line – thanks to some clever technology and AMG suspension setup it is incredibly quick through corners as well with body roll reduced to a minimum.

The GLE 63 S 4MATIC (W 166) is the sports car of the three. The 5.5 liter V8 produces a maximum of 585 hp and 760 Nm of torque.
The Mercedes-AMG GLS 63 4MATIC (X 166) is the ultimate travel car. It packs the perfect combination of comfort, practicality and performance. And it is easy to drift, too.

Mercedes-AMG GLS 63 – the Gran Turismo.

The GLS 63 4MATIC is the ultimate travel car of the three with space to fit up to 7 people plus luggage. The power output is the same as in the GLE 63 S, but due to its slightly higher weight it sprints from 0–100 km/h in 4.6 seconds and tops out at 270 km/h. The GLS is incredibly easy to drive and despite its sheer size it is a car easily to fall in love with. It packs the perfect combination of comfort, practicality and performance. And believe it or not but it is easy to drift, too.

Mercedes-AMG GLS 63 – the Gran Turismo.

The GLS 63 4MATIC is the ultimate travel car of the three with space to fit up to 7 people plus luggage. The power output is the same as in the GLE 63 S, but due to its slightly higher weight it sprints from 0–100 km/h in 4.6 seconds and tops out at 270 km/h. The GLS is incredibly easy to drive and despite its sheer size it is a car easily to fall in love with. It packs the perfect combination of comfort, practicality and performance. And believe it or not but it is easy to drift, too.

The Mercedes-AMG GLS 63 4MATIC (X 166) is the ultimate travel car. It packs the perfect combination of comfort, practicality and performance. And it is easy to drift, too.

Mercedes-AMG G 63 Edition 463 – the Beast.

Last but not least we present the G 63 – as much as it is a beast it is also a true icon and a statement on wheels. The M 157 engine produces 571 hp and 760 Nm of torque in the G 63. This allows for a 0–100 km/h sprint in 5.4 seconds and a top speed of 230 km/h. That makes it the slowest of the three, but the G has some aces up its sleeve. How about true 4WD and three electric locking differentials making it unstoppable on any terrain.

This G 63 is no ordinary G 63 – it is the special Edition 463. The Edition 463 references the internal model code for this generation G-Wagon W 463 which has been in production since 1990. Later this year Mercedes-Benz will unveil the new G-Class which will have a brand new chassis for the first time in 27 years.

This G 63 is no ordinary G 63 – it is the special Edition 463. It references the internal model code for this generation G-Wagon W 463 which has been in production since 1990.
Mercedes-AMG G 63 (W 463) – The Beast. As much as it is a beast it is also a true icon or a statement on wheels.

First checkpoint: Kochel am See.

The unique winter experience starts at Munich Airport where some of the participants arrive from very diverse countries like the United Arab Emirates and Malaysia. The first part of the tour leads the pack through Munich and south towards Garmisch on the German Autobahn. The area has been blessed with the first proper snow fall of the year and arctic temperatures so the surroundings look like a true winter wonderland. After a dash on the legendary Autobahn we exit to reach our first checkpoint: Kochel am See. This little village is located at a small alpine lake at the foot of the Alps and the scenery is nothing short of breathtaking. And to make it even better the snow clouds make way for blue sky and sunshine.

First checkpoint: Kochel am See.

The unique winter experience starts at Munich Airport where some of the participants arrive from very diverse countries like the United Arab Emirates and Malaysia. The first part of the tour leads the pack through Munich and south towards Garmisch on the German Autobahn. The area has been blessed with the first proper snow fall of the year and arctic temperatures so the surroundings look like a true winter wonderland. After a dash on the legendary Autobahn we exit to reach our first checkpoint: Kochel am See. This little village is located at a small alpine lake at the foot of the Alps and the scenery is nothing short of breathtaking. And to make it even better the snow clouds make way for blue sky and sunshine.

Mercedes-AMG G 63 (W 463) – The Beast. As much as it is a beast it is also a true icon or a statement on wheels.

Over the Kesselberg, past the Walchensee.

From Kochel am See we continue south on the scenic B 11 over the Kesselberg past the Walchensee towards the Austrian border. At Mittenwald we exit the main road and take the narrow L14 up towards Leutasch. For the first time the road is snow covered and we can test the capabilities of our cars’ all-wheel drive systems. Equipped with winter tires, the GLE 63 S, GLS 63 and G 63 have no problem making it up the twisty mountain road.

Drifting the Mercedes-AMG GLS 63 4MATIC (X 166) in the snow. Equipped with winter tires there is no problem for the GLS 63 to make it up the twisty mountain road.
Mercedes-Benz Lifestyle: The GTspirit Winter Experience 2017 in Austria.

On to Sölden.

Meanwhile we have crossed the border between Germany and Austria and there is nothing more than a sign to indicate we switched countries. As we pull up to our rustic lunch restaurant Ropferhof we have a scenic view down into the Inn valley. After a few selfies we get back into the cars to head to our final destination: Sölden!

Our convoy of cars turns heads in every village we pass and the brawny V8 sounds echo between the traditional Austrian houses. Especially the G 63 is not a car for the shy – it puts itself in the centre of attention time and time again.

GTspirit Winter Experience 2017. Outside the spectacular glass building of the ice Q skiers slide by while non-skiers travel down with the gondola like James Bond in “Spectre”.

Like James Bond in “Spectre”.

The next morning we wake up to crisp mountain air, the thermometer outside shows -12 degrees Celsius – at 1,368 metres above sea level. Better put on some warm clothes as we are going to the top of the mountain at 3,048 metres today. With a spectacular 360 degree panorama and blue skies as far as the eye can see, the ice Q on the Gaislachkogl is there to match the view. Outside the spectacular glass building skiers slide by covered top to bottom to protect them from the double digit minus temperatures, but inside it is warm and cozy. After lunch the skiers and snowboarders slide down the Gaislachkogl while some of the non-skiers travel down in the gondola like James Bond in “Spectre”.

300 kilometres back to Munich.

After four action-packed days it is time to head home again – the 300 kilometres back to Munich allow one last time to drive the three AMGs back to back. The G 63 is a very unique car that has no match in terms of style and off road capabilities. On the road the G 63 is no match for the performance and handling of the GLE 63 S and GLS 63. Especially the GLS is a very pleasant car for long journeys with the air suspension and the long wheel base.

Mercedes-AMG GLE 63 S 4MATIC (W 166): thanks to some clever technology and AMG suspension setup it is incredibly quick through corners as well with body roll reduced to a minimum.
Mercedes-Benz Lifestyle: The GTspirit Winter Experience 2017 in Austria.

Common passion for cars.

Four days after we started at Munich Airport we return to a very cold international airport. What an epic weekend it was – the perfect mix of driving, skiing, sledging and other winter activities but best of all was the international group of participants that all shared a common passion for cars and wintersports.

Common passion for cars.

Four days after we started at Munich Airport we return to a very cold international airport. What an epic weekend it was – the perfect mix of driving, skiing, sledging and other winter activities but best of all was the international group of participants that all shared a common passion for cars and wintersports.

Mercedes-Benz Lifestyle: The GTspirit Winter Experience 2017 in Austria.

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