Felix Jaehn: DJ and producer.

Felix Jaehn.

„I don’t take anything for granted.“

Felix Jaehn: The DJ & producer.

Felix Jaehn has taken the international music scene by storm. With his extraordinary feel for melody, the DJ and producer has released a string of hits that have topped the charts around the world. With many gold and platinum records to his name, he is setting new standards in the industry.

Taking inspiration from his experiences touring the world, Jaehn has created a signature sound that runs through all his tracks and live sets. He has struck a chord with a multi-generational community of music fans who avidly follow him on social media and music channels. Jaehn’s skills are largely self-taught, but built on his classical violin training and his studies at the Point Black Music School.

Today, the brand ambassador for Mercedes-Benz thrills audiences around the world with his phenomenal live performances. After travelling and touring, the multi-talented musician seeks relaxation at his home on the Baltic coast. Here he finds the peace and quiet he needs to work on new material.

Felix Jaehn embodies the spirit of a new generation of young DJs and musicians who are meeting the radical changes in the music industry with intelligence and insight. “You only have a chance if you fight for your dreams.”

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Felix Jaehn – the new Brand Ambassador of Mercedes-Benz.

Felix Jaehn is an internationally renowned DJ and music producer. He received several platinum and gold records. His breakthrough came in 2015 with the remix of “Cheerleader”, the first German song to reach no. 1 in the US charts since 1989.

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Amy Macdonald on Inspiration.

The Moment of inspiration is impossible to describe, says the Scottish singer.

There’s no such thing as creativity on demand.

How does inspiration feel?

It’s as if someone flips on a light switch. All at once that little bulb above my head comes on and I get this overwhelming urge to reach for my guitar. It can happen anytime, anywhere. Not so long ago I was playing a concert in Colmar, France. The show was near-perfect, and the atmosphere in the audience was brilliant. At that moment I suddenly felt totally happy and deeply inspired by everything and everyone around me. The Ancient Greeks believed inspiration came from the muses or the gods. And according to Christianity it is a gift from the Holy Spirit. In my own case I feel it’s something that comes from my subconscious. What I do know is that being a musician, and therefore always looking for inspiration, I’m a lot more observant of my environment than I otherwise would be. The world has become so fast-moving that for many people life is just one long, mad rush, with no time to sit back and think. Yet there are so many great stories if only you look more closely.

Inspiration comes from everyday things.

A lot of my inspiration comes from ordinary, everyday things – maybe something I saw on the news or that happened to my friends or family. I’ve written songs about my grandmother, or about football or the San José mine disaster. My new album is like that, too, with lots of different themes. One song is about how it feels to lose someone you love. There’s another one I wrote for my best friend who moved to New York last year and was terribly homesick. I visited her there a few times. It was amazing – New York in winter is totally different from New York on a scorching summer’s day. I enjoyed leaving Glasgow for a while and absorbing all those new impressions. But though travel can be inspiring, I’m not someone who has to travel to find inspiration.

You never know when to expect it.

The best ideas come to me when I’m walking my dog, driving around in my sports car or watching a Rangers match. Familiar themes mean people can identify more with my songs than if I wrote about distant, exotic places many of us have never been to. Also, I can be much more precise in the songs if they’re about things we can all relate to. Nothing is ever too small or unimportant for me to make a song about it. That moment of inspiration is impossible to describe. It’s as if everything suddenly starts happening of its own accord. My mind just takes off on a journey. Unfortunately you never know when to expect it. Something happens and it just triggers a feeling inside me – it may be positive or negative.

This can happen four times in one week or just once a month. And sometimes the inspiration just dries up altogether. My colleagues always say that’s one of their biggest fears. I try not to let it get to me. Good ideas take time.

No idea where I got my creativity from.

Try to control or force it and you won’t create anything worthwhile. If you don’t believe in something yourself, who else is going to do so? It’s funny – I can’t really explain where I get my creative streak from. Nobody in my family is artistic in any way. Maybe that’s why I didn’t start writing songs till I was 14. Music means a lot to me, but at times I do wonder whether this job really serves a useful purpose. I only have to think of my sister who’s a doctor and works really hard. Nobody thanks her: they just expect her to be there, helping people and saving lives. It’s crazy how celebrities get idolised, yet someone like my sister, who’s doing great and valuable work, doesn’t get any attention. Her job’s much more important than mine. I’m not clever enough to be a doctor – I only wish I was!

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Urban Lights – Mercedes-AMG SLC 43.

Driving a powerful car and listening to music can produce similar emotional responses, an engine’s roar being the equivalent to a bassline drop or guitar solo. We matched RPM with BPM, combining the sounds of the Mercedes-AMG SLC 43 and London artist Azekel in an all new adrenaline charged video. SLC 43: Fuel consumption combined: 7.8 l/100 km; combined; CO₂ emissions: 178 g/km*

Watch London Artist Azekel Test Drive the New Mercedes-AMG SLC 43 in “Urban Lights”.

Urban Lights.

Guest feature by Highsnobiety: London artist Azekel test drives the new Mercedes-AMG SLC 43.

Fuel consumption combined: 7.8 l/100km;

combined CO₂ emissions: 178 g/km.*

Matching RPM with BPM.

Driving a powerful car and listening to music can produce similar emotional responses, an engine’s roar being the equivalent to a bassline drop or guitar solo. We matched RPM with BPM, combining the sounds of the Mercedes-AMG SLC 43 and London artist Azekel in an all new adrenaline charged video.

Matching RPM with BPM.
Putting it to the test.

Putting it to the test.

We headed to Azekel’s home turf where he tested out the car’s 3.0-litre V6 engine during a dark summer night in the city. The model boasts 367 hp and 520 Nm of torque, catapulting the car from 0 to 62.5 mph in just 4.7 seconds.

Putting it to the test.

We headed to Azekel’s home turf where he tested out the car’s 3.0-litre V6 engine during a dark summer night in the city. The model boasts 367 hp and 520 Nm of torque, catapulting the car from 0 to 62.5 mph in just 4.7 seconds.

Putting it to the test.
Looking for a musical equal.

Looking for a musical equal.

The car’s dynamic capabilities needed a musical equal. Azekel is a British singer-songwriter, musician, and producer; he’s released three EPs and recently featured on and co-wrote Massive Attack’s “Ritual Spirit”.

The musician wrote and produced “New Romance” — the track featured in the video — from his East London flat. Layering rich vocals over a downtempo beat, Azekel’s raw sound contrasts the Mercedes’ high-octane performance in the fast-paced capital.


Guest feature: All statements in this article are personal opinions and impressions of the author and sometimes not of the Daimler AG.

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